Frequently Asked Questions

What are your hours of operation?
Our clinic hours vary by location. Appointments can be scheduled at any of our physical therapy clinics. With locations all over San Diego county, we have a convenient location that's close to home, work, or school. View clinic locations
Will my insurance pay for treatment? What would I have to pay each visit?
Most insurance plans cover outpatient therapy. Usually, there is a deductible and/or a co-payment for each visit. We collect co-payments at the time of your visit. For your convenience, we accept Visa or Mastercard as well as cash or check.
Do I need to be referred by my doctor?
All treatment requires a physician referral. (Some insurance plans do allow physical therapy treatment withoug a physician referral - consult with you insurance planner.)
What do I need to bring?
On your initial visit, please bring doctor's orders for physical therapy, any applicable insurance referrals or referral numbers, your insurance card, and any other appropriate billing information. In addition, you may wish to download and fill out the physical therapy forms ahead of your first visit and bring them with you. Download forms
What should I wear?
Loose-fitting, comfortable clothing is recommended. You may want to wear or bring shorts if we are treating an ankle or knee.
How long is each visit?
The first visit, the initial evaluation, takes about one hour. Each follow-up visit will take about 30 to 60 minutes.
What should I expect during my initial visit?
To initiate a program of therapy, the therapist examines the patient. This includes obtaining a patient history, performing relevant systems reviews, and selecting and administering specific tests and measurements to obtain data.
In addition to the evaluation, what else will be involved in my treatment?
Therapists may use one or a combination of the following interventions to achieve treatment goals:
  • Therapeutic exercises (including aerobic conditioning)
  • Functional training in self care and home management
  • Manual therapy techniques (soft tissue and joint mobilization)
  • Physical agents, mechanical, and/or thermal modalities
  • Electrotherapeutic modalities
  • Educational and/or application of assistive, adaptive, and protective devices and equipment
How often are my treatments? How long do they last?
Frequency and duration of treatment will be determined by your physician or after the initial evaluation by your therapist. The typical frequency is 2-3 times per week.
What is a physical therapist?
Physical Therapists are licensed health care professionals who are experts in musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Therapists are trained to analyze movement and identify abnormal mechanics. From this assessment, a physical therapist will treat a dysfunction with manual skills. This will accelerate the recovery process.
What is an occupational therapist?
The occupational therapist is a trained and licensed health care professional who can make a complete evaluation of the impact of a disease on the activities of the patient at home and in work situations. The therapist also considers hobbies and recreational activities when making his assessment.
What is a physical therapist assistant?
Physical therapist assistants, or PTAs, are skilled health care providers who work under the supervision of physical therapists. Duties of the PTA include assisting the physical therapist in implementing treatment programs, training patients in exercises and activities of daily living, conducting treatments, and reporting to the physical therapist on the patient's responses. In addition to direct patient care, the physical therapist assistant may also perform such functions as patient transport and clinic or equipment preparation and maintenance.
What can I do to get better while I'm at home?
Your therapy program will include a home program to be carried out independently. Our therapists use patient-related instruction to educate not only the patient, but also families and other care givers when necessary, about the patient's current condition, treatment plan, and future transition to home, work, or community roles.